Welcome to Rebecca Harding Davis: Complete Works

Rebecca Harding Davis: Complete Works aspires to make Davis’s work conveniently accessible to all and to encourage the study of her life and writing. Best known for her pioneering critique of industrialization in “Life in the Iron-Mills” (1861), Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) was a prolific author who contributed fiction in a variety of genres as well as essays and editorials to a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals, including the Atlantic Monthly, Lippincott’s, the Independent, Galaxy, Peterson’s Magazine, the New York Tribune, the Saturday Evening Post, the Congregationalist, and the Youth’s Companion, to name a few.

Her work consistently strives to tell, as she puts it, “the story of to-day,” and to that end, this ongoing project includes Davis’s published writing as well as about seventy personal letters with annotations to describe historical references and allusions. New items are added to the archive on a regular basis.

The archive also includes a robust selection of Davis’s letters (most transcribed and annotated by Davis biographer Sharon M. Harris).

See Collections for a chronology of Davis's life, a bibliography of her published works, and a bibliography of scholarship.  

Recently Added Items

"Women in Literature." Independent, 7 May 1891, pp. 1-2.

“Women in Literature.” Independent, 7 May 1891, pp. 1-2. There can surely be little doubt that women will occupy a much wider space in American…

“The ‘Black North’” Independent, 6 Feb. 1902, pp. 338-40.

“The ‘Black North’” Independent, 6 February 1902, pp. 338-40. Mr. W. E. Burghardt Du Bois[1] has lately finished his series of advisory lectures[2] to…

"One or Two Plain Questions." The Independent, 22 October 1908, pp. 944-46.

“One or Two Plain Questions” By Rebecca Harding Davis Every day the Weather Bureau[1] gives us a report in the news papers of the condition of the…

"Two Methods with the Negro." The Independent, 31 March 1898, pp. 401-2.

“Two Methods with the Negro” By Rebecca Harding Davis The recent Negro Conference at Tuskegee[1] was especially useful, as it set before the public…

"The Plague Spot of America." The Independent, 4 July 1889, p. 1.

“The Plague Spot of America” By Rebecca Harding Davis The Prince of Wales, it is said, is at the head of a movement to honor the memory of Father…

"One Woman's Question." The Independent, 18 July 1907, pp. 132-33.

“One Woman’s Question” By Rebecca Harding Davis Did you ever notice a shrewd farmer as he goes over his fields, how he takes account of every trifling…