Fiction

Dublin Core

Title

Fiction

Items in the Fiction Collection

DOCTOR WARRICK’S DAUGHTERSCHAPTER I   DOCTOR SAMUEL WARRICK was a surgeon in a Federal regiment from the beginning to the end of the Civil War. His wife, in the meantime, lived with her children in the old Warrick homestead near Luxborough in…

Earthen Pitchers  Chapter I.            “We’ll drive?” said young Chalkley, anxiously, halting on the steps of the Continental Hotel. He had Mr. Burgess, the English magazinist, in charge. “Oh, drive, of course!” beckoning to a…

  FRANCES WALDEAUX Chapter I.   In another minute the Kaiser Wilhelm would push off from her pier in Hoboken. The last bell had rung, the last uniformed officer and white-jacketed steward had scurried up the gangway. The pier was massed with people…

“Here & There in the South” I.--Old and New THE train that rushed out of the wide winding suburbs of Washington down into Virginia, in the dawn of a cold February morning, was filled with Northerners going to New Orleans. They had, oddly…

"In the Gray Cabins of New England" AN Englishman who recently visited this country wrote from Boston to a friend: As I have so little time in America, I have decided to spend it all in New England. It is the American race that I wish to study, nor…

JOHN ANDROSS   CHAPTER I.   THE Niagara Express, just before sunset at the close of a sultry July day, was puffing slowly into Lock Haven, a small lumber-town which is the key of access to the wild mountainous district of Pennsylvania, from the…

"Life in the Iron-Mills." "Is this the end?O Life, as futile, then, as frail!What hope of answer or redress?" A CLOUDY day: do you know what that is in a town of iron-works? The sky sank down before dawn, muddy, flat, immovable. The air is thick,…

“MESMERISM vs. COMMON SENSE.”   CHAPTER I. Miss Wynn followed her brother out of his new house, and stood on the verandah. She looked down at the slope of forest and farm land. “You ought to be a satisfied man, Stephen,” she said, in her…

PUT OUT OF THE WAY. CHAPTER I.             It was an ominously dull evening, even in Broadway. The rain beat on the top of Miss Hubbard’s hackney-coach, and drenched the windows, and shut her and old Mrs. McIntosh inside into a little…

THE SECOND LIFE. CHAPTER I.             I am a hard man. I wish you to remember that when I tell you my story. Hard, selfish, money-making. My life has been like this December day—bleak and gray, with a bit of red sunshine warming it up…